Schedule

I’m happy to give lectures, book-talks, and discussions on any of the topics posted here…and more…at Celtic festivals, bookstores, book groups, and libraries within the Great Lakes States. For more information, email me at author.kerry.ross@gmail.com.

Some of my past appearances have included:

  • March 11, 2015  7:00 pm  Pulling Strings: The History of the Gaelic Harp, Loutit District Library, Grand Haven, Michigan
  • May 18, 2015  7:00 pm  Nobles of the Wood: Trees of the Celts, Kalamazoo Irish American Club, Theo & Stacy’s Restaurant, Portage, Michigan.
  • September 2, 2015  12:00 pm Pulling Strings: The History of the Gaelic Harp, Counterpart Luncheon, Spring Lake, Michigan. To make reservations, please visit mycounterpart.wordpress.com
  • September 19, 2015   12:45 pm  Pulling Strings: The History of the Gaelic Harp, Muskegon Irish Music Festival, Cultural Stage.
  • September 20, 2015    2:45 pm  Law and Order: A Look at Early Irish Law, Muskegon Irish Music Festival, Cultural Stage

Available Programs

Pulling Strings: The History of the Gaelic Harp

Most people recognize the harp as the national emblem of Ireland, but did you know that the familiar triangular-framed harp did not originate in Ireland? In this PowerPoint presentation, featuring samples from the tradition’s finest harpists, Kerry Ross examines the history and development of the instrument and explores what makes the Gaelic harp unique.

Law and Order: A Look at Early Irish Law

Ireland boasts the oldest surviving codified law system in Europe. Join Celtic scholar Kerry Ross for a look at the brehon laws, which governed Irish civilization from the arrival of the Gaels in Ireland (700 BC) until the English Penal Laws were enacted in 1695.

Take off Your Brat and Stay Awhile:  Fashion in Ireland’s Golden Age

In this PowerPoint presentation, Celtic scholar Kerry Ross takes a peek at the wardrobe of Ireland’s Golden Age (100-800 AD), along with the laws governing the wearing of certain colors and the dye stuffs that were used to produce those colors.

Ogam: The Gaelic Alphabet

Up until the fourth century AD, the Irish relied on oral traditions to pass on wisdom from one generation to the next. It was around this time that ogam was developed as a mystical means of communication. In this PowerPoint presentation, Celtic scholar Kerry Ross delves into the archaeological and literary evidence, along with some fun with modern-day interpretations of this ancient writing system.

Are We There Yet?: Irish Kingdoms in Scotland and Wales

Moving across the country is a challenge for the modern parent, but can you imagine relocating your family across the sea in an ox-hide boat? Due to political struggles, the Dál Riata of Ulster and the Déisi of Munster did just that. Join Celtic scholar Kerry Ross as she relates the stories of these Irish tribes who established Gaelic society in Scotland and Wales.

The Mantle of Brigit: The Status of Women in Gaelic Society

From early times, Irish women enjoyed significant freedom and power, unlike their contemporaries elsewhere in Europe. In this PowerPoint presentation, Celtic scholar Kerry Ross takes a look at early Irish law, along with the literary traditions which portray ancient Irish women as aggressive equals to their male counterparts.

Nobles of the Wood: Trees of the Celts

The ancient Celtic peoples of Ireland and Britain possessed a vast understanding of the natural world. To them, trees were sacred for their cultural, economic, and medicinal values – so much so that laws were enacted to protect them. In this PowerPoint presentation, Kerry Ross explores the symbolism and folklore surrounding the most revered trees of Ireland and Britain – many of which are right in our own backyards.

The Lion, the Harp, and the Dragon

The Celtic languages are some of the oldest languages in Europe and are still spoken by 3.5 million people today. Celtic scholar Kerry Ross shares the lilt of these languages spoken in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales through songs and poems.

Note: All programs can be tailored to the length needed. They can also be presented “low-tech” for small groups of 20 people or less.

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